9. How to say ‘Goodbye’ in Formal Italian – ArrivederLa

9. How to say ‘Goodbye’ in Formal Italian – ArrivederLa

‘ArrivederLa’ is a more formal way to say ‘arrivederci’. But isn’t ‘arrivederci’ already formal? It is definitely more formal than ‘ciao’ but there may be a situation where you need to increase the degree of formality even more, to demonstrate your respect and politeness.

You use ‘arrivederLa’ when you are speaking to one person, the ‘ci’ in ‘arrivederci’, is the plural version. If you speak to an elderly person, it’s a good idea to use ‘arrivederLa’ – it won’t sound pompous or pretentious, it will only highlight your respect.

Of course, situations may differ. You can be super-informal with your grandma or on friendly terms with all the big bosses at work. However, when dealing with a foreign culture, it is best to be a bit on the formal side at first before you get to know the people and the culture better.

10. How to say ‘See you later’ in Italian – A dopo

‘A dopo’ is an Italian equivalent of the English ‘see you later’ but is only used when you’re actually going to see the person again later that day.

Imagine seeing a foreign guest off at the airport and they say ‘see you soon’. It is not that big of a mistake, but it feels weird as you are unlikely to see them again soon or maybe at all.

11. How to say ‘See you soon’ in Italian – A presto

Italians take their goodbyes seriously. Or, to be more exact, literally. Similar to the previous example, do not say ‘a presto’ if you are not going to see the person soon.

If you are leaving work for the day and saying goodbye to your colleagues who you will see the next day – great. If you have been traveling in Italy and are leaving to go back to your home country – this is not the best choice. Instead, saying ‘arrivederci’ would be more appropriate.

12. How to say ‘See you tomorrow’ in Italian – A domani

Can you see the pattern yet? Read More